CDCS Autumn Seminar Series: A Focus on Climate Change

CDCS logo and graphic of data displayed on a computer screen, with a natural landscape in the background

 

As a new academic year begins, we are pleased to announce the CDCS Autumn Seminar Series. With the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) scheduled to take place in Glasgow later this year, this semester's series explores how researchers in the arts, humanities and social sciences are contributing to debates and taking action to address the climate crisis.

Drawn from a variety of international institutions and backgrounds, our speakers all conduct interdisciplinary data-led research focused on aspects of environmentalism, ecological issues and climate change.  Together, we aim to amplify the important issues being discussed in Glasgow in November.

We are particularly delighted to be working with Sussex Humanities Lab, University of Southampton Digital Humanities and the Humanities and Data Science Turing Special Interest Group to host two joint events during the first two weeks of November, coinciding with COP 26.  The first, a public roundtable, will explore different perspectives on the ecological and human costs of digital technologies and on the opportunities they present to make our world more sustainable. This will be followed up by a invitation-only workshop, "Greening Digital Humanities", which will explore how the DH community of practice can contribute to a more sustainable future.

 

29 September: Our first event in the series will feature Tommaso Venturini (CNRS Centre for Internet and Society, Paris),  speaking about the operations of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change in his paper Computation at the Service of Social Sciences: Investigating IPCC Leadership through Network Analysis and Machine Learning.  

13 October: Amy Coombs, Robert Suits (both University of Chicago), and Jo Guldi (Southern Methodist University), will give presentations interrogating sociocultural narratives around climate change. Presentation titles are as follows:

Reproducing the Apocalypse: Conservative Evangelical Reader Disputation in Responses to Climate Change Media - Amy Coombs

Energy Transitions in US History: Understanding the Prospects for Future Decarbonization - Robert Suits

The Long History and Future of Global Coordinated Governance of the Environment - Jo Guldi

27 October: Matthew Brander and Atreya Dey (University of Edinburgh Business School) will share research on carbon financing, discussing how financial analysts use greenhouse gas emissions data and how rising sea levels impact on sovereign credit.

3 November: 'Digital Materialities / Digital Imaginaries': roundtable exploring different perspectives on the ecological and human costs of digital technologies and on the opportunities they present to make our world more sustainable. This event is held in partnership with the Sussex Humanities Lab, University of Southampton Digital Humanities and the Humanities and Data Science Turing Special Interest Group.

24 November: Professor Jennifer Gabrys (University of Cambridge) will present on the SmartForests project, which investigates the increasing use of digital technologies to monitor and manage forests for addressing environmental change. 

8 December: Theodora Dryer will present on her research conducted with the AI Now Institute, examining the politics of automated decision-making systems in questions of environmental justice.

 

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